Microlecture 29: What to Do When a Bi-lingual Family Member Overrides the Medical Interpreter

Microlecture 003: What to do when patient’s proxy has Limited English Proficiency


 

When caring for a vulnerable patient, we rely heavily on the proxy to guide us. However, if the proxy has communication difficulties it becomes exponentially difficult to make health decisions.

Watch the microlecture and try to solve the problem of how to provide patient-centered, family-oriented care when dealing with a patient who is a minor and unable to speak for himself and his proxy who has Limited English Proficiency.
VJ Periyakoil, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine. Tweet to us: @palliator

Microlecture 004: Talk Directly To The Patient



This microlecture addresses patient rights. If the patient has Limited English Proficiency., don’t they still have the right to access all the information about their healthcare? Don’t they still have the right to take advantage of the therapeutic bond that should exist between every doctor and the patient? How can we decrease the psychological distance between the clinician and the patient? What are some simple steps we can take?
VJ Periyakoil, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine. Tweet to us: @palliator

Microlecture 006: The Interpreter as an Asset



Medical interpreters (MI) report feeling like intruders in some clinical encounters. I have talked to numerous MIs and they are a bit baffled by how some clinicians try to talk in English to patients who do not speak English!

Busy clinicians are often wary of anything that might increase the encounter time with patients. That being said, how can we effectively convey complex information like hospital discharge instructions to patients who do not speak English?
VJ Periyakoil, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine. Tweet to us: @palliator