Microlecture 27: Is It Acceptable to Make Small-Talk During a Clinical Encounter

Microlecture 26: How to Save Time in a Clinical Encounter

Microlecture 004: Talk Directly To The Patient



This microlecture addresses patient rights. If the patient has Limited English Proficiency., don’t they still have the right to access all the information about their healthcare? Don’t they still have the right to take advantage of the therapeutic bond that should exist between every doctor and the patient? How can we decrease the psychological distance between the clinician and the patient? What are some simple steps we can take?
VJ Periyakoil, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine. Tweet to us: @palliator

Microlecture 005: No Censoring Rule


 

What should the medical interpreter do during the clinical encounter? Should they pick and choose in terms of what information they translate and what they withhold? Should they omit certain aspects of what the clinician says?

What should the interpreter do if  one clinician disagrees with another during the clinical encounter? Should they interpret arguments so the patient can understand opposing points of view?

Find out by watching the microlecture VJ Periyakoil, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine. Tweet to us: @palliator

Microlecture 020: Should Clinicians Engage in Small Talk with Patients?


Should we do small-talk with patients to set them at ease? This may be a standard expectation in some cultures. In fact, by making patients comfortable, we can expect them to engage more meaningfully and be willing to participate and take an active role in their care. Having said that, is small talk the best use of the 10-20 min of face time we have in a typical clinical encounter? It is precious time and we want to use every drop of it to improve the health and well being of patients. Given that time is limited, what are some simple strategies to connect with the patient, set them at ease while still being mindful of limited time?